Christians, Sex, Yin, and Yang (2 of 2)

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Masculinizing Society. Masculinizing Sex.

It’s an age old story. Males win. Females lose.
It happens in our society.
It happens in our beds.
And when it happens, everybody loses.

In the East there is a way of thinking that offers us a path forward. There is a way of non-oppositional cooperation between masculine and feminine energy.

Have a listen. Have better sex!
Doug

   


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3 Comments

  1. Yin and yang provides a useful lens through which to consider human sexuality. Another lens you may find interesting, FWIW, has probably been started better elsewhere but I’ve not heard such so this is my formulation, warts and all.

    Usually personhood is preeminent in how we think but some have conceptualized persons as the means by which genes compete. By extension, I think of societies as expressing a blend of the sperm’s desires or the egg’s desires.

    The desire of the sperm is to be widely distributed while the egg wants “a good nest”, safety and security. So a society that maximizes the sperm’s attainment of its desire might be rapacious, its women mere chattel, its girls unvalued, its boys the survivors of harsh competition. I think of Vikings and chronically war-torn areas of the world.

    Extreme egg-guided societies would overemphasize stability although none come to mind.
    (As I said, for what it’s worth.)

    I don’t think that this concept is quite the same as patriarchy vs matriarchy. And obviously most societies fluctuate over time and represent a blend of these two extremes. These are just thoughts that I was reminded of by your last two podcasts about Y&Y.

  2. Yin and yang provides a useful lens through which to consider human sexuality. Another lens you may find interesting, FWIW, has probably been stated better elsewhere but I’ve not heard such so this is my formulation, warts and all.

    Usually personhood is preeminent in how we think but some have conceptualized persons as the means by which genes compete. By extension, I think of societies as expressing a blend of the sperm’s desires or the egg’s desires.

    The desire of the sperm is to be widely distributed while the egg wants “a good nest”, safety and security. So a society that maximizes the sperm’s attainment of its desire might be rapacious, its women mere chattel, its girls unvalued, its boys the survivors of harsh competition. I think of Vikings and chronically war-torn areas of the world.

    Extreme egg-guided societies would overemphasize stability although none come to mind.
    (As I said, for what it’s worth.)

    I don’t think that this concept is quite the same as patriarchy vs matriarchy. And obviously most societies fluctuate over time and represent a blend of these two extremes. These are just thoughts that I was reminded of by your last two podcasts about Y&Y.

  3. This comment has to do with an older podcast that I couldn’t comment on, not sure which one. It has to do with the standards we set with females and how society views them. I just had one thought: This probably goes back 2,000 years, all the way back to the Virgin Mary. A few hundred years after Jesus died, she was venerated and people even went so far as to create the Immaculate Conception (which by my remembering is nowhere in the bible…there are many more women who are more prominent than her in the Gospels).

    But my point is that if Mary was the “ideal” female, the one who all females should strive to be, what a losing fight that has been for two millennia. For a very long time, a women’s “job” was to have babies and take care of the family. But the ideal woman was a virgin. Talk about a lose-lose situation.